Design Guide – Cube 2

To get the most out of our 3D printing services, it’s important to start with a well-optimized 3D model. This design guide outlines the basic capabilities of the Cube 2 and what to keep in mind when designing certain features.

Features

Select the features you would like to learn more about.

A supported wall is one that is connected to a supporting surface on at least two sides. The minimum recommended wall thickness for the Cube 2 printers is 1mm. Supported walls smaller than this may warp or otherwise not print to specification.

im1

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_1
In our tests, the Cube 2 had the tendency to thicken walls that were less than
1mm in specification.

An unsupported wall is one that is connected to a supporting surface fewer than two sides. The minimum recommended wall thickness for the Cube 2 printers is 1mm. Unsupported walls smaller than this may warp or otherwise not print to specification.

im2

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_2
In our tests, the Cube 2 had the tendency to thicken walls that were less than
1mm in specification.

‘Engraved’ features are features that are imprinted or recessed in your model. Details less than 0.4mm in thickness may become distorted or invisible.

im3

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_3
In our tests, the Cube 2 handles engraved detail well. However, very small features still showed variance.

‘Embossed’ features are shallow raised features on you model. Details lass than 0.75 mm in thickness may become distorted or invisible.

im4

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_4
In our tests, the Cube 2 had the tendency to thicken walls that were less than
0.75mm in specification.

Depending on their orientation, the Cube 2 may distort small holes. The recommended minimum diameter is 0.5mm. Holes printed on the XY plane may be prone to closing more than holes on the ZX/ZY planes, especially if these holes lie on the build plate.

im5

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_5
In our tests, the Cube 2 printed small holes on the Z-axis with a small amount of error. Holes on the XY plane, however, didn’t print with any accuracy.

Any feature whose length is greater than twice its width is considered a ‘wire’. Wires printed vertically are especially fragile and susceptible to deformation.

im7

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_7
In our tests, the Cube 2 had a tendency to increase the diameter of vertical wires with a specified diameter of less than 3mm. Wires below 3mm specification were extremely prone to breaking. At 0.3mm and below, nothing was printed.

An overhang is any part of your model that sticks out horizontally (parallel to the build plate). Because the Cube 2 does not have a separate support material, these types of overhangs can become deformed depending on the length.

im8

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_8
In our tests, the Cube 2 performed acceptably on overhangs up to 4mm, which had some distortion. Overhangs from 4-mm had a large amount of distortion. Overhangs 8mm and longer had a sever amount of distortion. The above metric measures the percent increase in thickness of a 5mm-thick overhang relative to its length.

Not all unsupported overhangs will be at an angle parallel to the build plate. The angle of an overhang will affect the resulting print quality. The Cube 2 showed poor performance after 35 degrees.

im9

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_9
In our tests, the Cube 2 performed acceptably on overhangs at angles up to 35 degrees. The above metric measures the percent increase in thickness of a 3.2mm-thick overhang relative to its angle.

A horizontal span is any unsupported bottom surface that is connected to a supporting structure on at least two sides. Horizontal spans generally come out much better than unsupported overhangs on the Cube 2. However, after a certain length, distortion will still occur.

im10

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

c2_10
In our tests, the Cube 2 showed a significant amount of bowing with large overhangs. The above metric measures the percent increase in thickness of a 2.5mm-thick horizontal span relative to its length.

No 3D printer is perfect, and , as such, it is important to include a bit of tolerance when parts are intended to fit together. With the Cube 2, we recommend making a hole 3%larger than the part intended to fit in it.

im6

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

In our tests, the Cube 2 printed holes (9-10mm diameter, both round and square) accurately to their specification (+0.5mm). A 8.9mm round plug required a 9.1mm hole, while a 9.15mm square plug required  a 9.35mm hole.

Of you want to print a part with moving components, it is important to leave a certain amount of clearance between the parts that are intended to move. ‘Horizontal’ refers to the idea that, in an axle/housing pair, the assembly is printed parallel to the build plate.

im12

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts

In our tests, the Cube 2 required 0.6mm of clearance in order for a horizontally-printed axle to be able to rotate inside its housing.

Of you want to print a part with moving components, it is important to leave a certain amount of clearance between the parts that are intended to move. ‘Vertical’ refers to the idea that, in an axle/housing pair, the assembly is printed perpendicular to the build plate.

im12

Click on the image to see detailed illustrations and photos of the printed parts.

In our tests, the Cube 2 required 0.6mm of clearance in order for a vertically printed axle to be able to rotate inside its housing. It should be noted that, due to the vertical print orientation, these types of parts were extremely fragile, especially under torsion.